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>> susie: investors face fear and confusion as japan's nuclear crisis continues. energy regulators around the globe warn about the risks and u.s. stocks get whipsawed. >> tom: as the situation unfolds, how is the nuclear industry responding to the escalating crisis? and what is in store for investors? you're watching "nightly business report" for wednesday, march 16. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. fears escalated today around the world about the nuclear crisis in japan. comments from energy officials in europe and the u.s. raised questions about danger from the damaged reactors, tom. >> tom: susie, these were stark comments from top global experts. europe's energy chief said japan's dai-ichi nuclear plant was "effectively out of control." the u.s. energy secretary said there was a "partial meltdown" there. additionally, americans within 50 miles of t
>> hello everyone. welcome to our special coverage of the events in japan. >> welcome. >> here are the top stories of this hour. workers at the fukushima nuclear plant are scrambling to save the reactors from a meltdown following last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami. in libya, the government says its supporters are making gains at the expense of rivals. the u.n. secretary general urges all sidein the conflict to cause a ceasefire. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> nuclear experts in japan are still battling to prevent a meltdown at the fukushima power plant. concerns are growing about a pool holding spent nuclear fuel at the reactor complex. workers are using all means possible to cool the reactors that were damaged in the earthquake. the plant had to be evacuated temporarily at one point due to high levels of radiation. >> dense clouds of stream rose from the fukushima nuclear plant on wednesday. but the fire in reactor four was of less concern to the authorities than a possible fracture to the containment vessel of reactor three. p
edition of "world business today" as cnn continues its coverage of the earthquake and tsunami in japan. >>> sea walter being poured from helicopters on to japan's damaged nuclear reactors. that is the scene on thursday. engineers attempt once again to avert catastrophic radiation leaks. the japanese military is dropping tons of water on to two of the six reactors at the fukushima daiichi nuclear plant trying to cool the plant's fuel rods. but the company that runs the plant now reports that the radiation levels actually increased. they're also bringing in police, water cannon. officials say radiation levels right now are too high for personnel to venture inside. >> translator: spence force conducted a spring of water from the air. and the police are also going to start the water spraying by the water cannon trucks. so we're trying to combine the two approaches to maximize the effect of water spraying. >> hundreds of thousands of residents in the area have been evacuated. many are seeking refuge in public shelters. japan ordered people to move at least 20 kilometers away from the plant.
: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the unite states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska or u.s. territories in the pas civic. >> susie: besides japan's nuclear crisis a big spike in the japanese yen is creating a currency crisis. finance ministers from ar
for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to install a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter planes will be brought in to help those wanting to leave the country. charlie d'agata is in yoshida, japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wondering where i am. we've been trying to make our way to the quake zone. the japanese military has taken over all the highways. obviously we're trying to steer clear of the nuclear power plant. we had to cut through the moun
and britain advised their nationals to leave tokyo and the north of japan. >> welcome to bbc world news. i am kara in london. also in this program -- in rain in your security forces. the message to bahrain by the u.n.'s top security official. the crisis and i riposte shows no signs of ending -- the crisis and the ivory coast shows no signs of ending. hello. seven days after the disaster, japanese authorities are still battling to bring stability to the stricken fukushima power or plan. let joined my colleague tony wilcox. >> hello, and welcome to japan where authorities are still trying to cool down the stricken nuclear plant in fukushima. the united states government and the british government has now advised all nationals living in tokyo and the north of the country to leave the area if they wish, and flights are being arranged. let's just have a look at some of the developments in the past few hours. it is early evening. darkins has volunteered but this morning, japanese military helicopters were dropping up to 7 tons of sea water at a time over the four reactors at that fukushima plant. t
.m. friday in tokyo, 3:00 on thursday afternoon in new york city and i'm shephard smith in japan's capital city as radiation leaks from the damaged fukushima nuclear plant to the north. president obama is set to speak to the nation on the nuclear cries in just a few minutes and we will bring you that live as it begins. crews are using water cannons and helicopters to try to keep the reactors from everheating and melting down. a biggest concern is what is happening at reactor number three, the only unit that uses fuel mixed with highly toxic combinations with a lower melting point and officials say the cooling pool there is almost empty. there also are problems with a pool for spent fuel rods at reactor four at fukushima and the u.s. nuclear chief says the water evaporated. if they are exposed they can catch fire, melt, and release large amounts of ridation into the air. we are told crews are still working on a new power line that would restore the electricity there in theory and get the water pumps back up and running. officials say the cold snap is slowing down their effort but not word o
on the fukushima daiichi power plant. two japan self defense forces helicopters have sprayed water on the reactor building at the fukushima daiichi power plant. tokyo police guard will use a water cannon truck to spray water from the outside to cool the storage fuel. each helicopter is capability of carrying 7.5 tons of sea water. the operation was held at around 9:48, 9:52, 9:54 a.m. and also 10:00 a.m. on thursday morning. due to radiation levels, though, the operation should be conducted from a minimum altitude and limited to 40 minutes per helicopter per day. on wednesday, a white plume was seen rising from a reactor building at the fukushima daiichi power plant. tokyo electric power company says water in a storage pool intended to cool spent fuel apparently evaporated from the vapor has the cooling system has not been working since the quake. there is urgent need for cooling to stop the fuel from emitting hydrogen for possible explosion or meltdown. at 9:48 a.m., 9:52 a.m., 9:54 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. japan time on thursday, two japan self defense force helicopters have prayed water on the crip
comments@captioncolorado.com >> couric: tonight, emergency workers return to japan's crippled nuclear plant after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but
to wbaltv.com and clicking on politics. >> fears of a nuclear meltdown in japan have prompted the u.s. to authorize the first evacuation of americans out of the country. the nuclear regulatory commission says this decision was based on the risk of radioactive contamination. let's go live to washington for the latest. >> the un says the situation is very serious but not deteriorating at this point. president obama says americans and japan need to be prepared. >> they spoke at the japanese embassy in washington and said the u.s. is bringing all sources to bear to protect american citizens in japan. they sought to reassure americans at home. >> we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the u.s., whether it is that west coast, why, alaska or u.s. territories. >> at the nuclear plant, crews have been scrambling, using helicopters and cannons to douse the reactor with thousands of gallons of water. but it's difficult to know whether it's working. >> we believe it will help to cool down the fuel. however, we are not able to access the site. >> the first evacuations fled to toky
cannot wait for mummy to come home. bbc news, northeastern japan. >> it is astonishing, the resilience and restraint that the people have been exhibiting. >> you mentioned yukio edano and his latest news conference, and he said their credentials have not been affected. how can that be when some manufacturers have all said that their manufacturing will be affected? >> that is a good question. i do not know the ins and outs. what everyone is saying is that the supply lines will have been affected by this, and a lot of the microchips that are going to your ipad or my iphone, they come through here. this will have a knock-on effect. but it also depends on who was in the earthquake zone. i am not sure how many microchip plants have been affected. the last time i checked, the nikkei was down. this country is twice as indebted as the united states, and beyond the reconstruction efforts, putting money back into the economy, at the end of today, japan has been struggling ever since it's a bubble burst in 1990 and will continue to do so -- ever since its bubble burst. >> this is bbc news. still
by spiking radiation levels. japan doubled the number of workers heading into the plant to assess the situation. all this time, the japanese had been telling people to stay 12 miles away, but that may not be far enough. >> american citizens in japan evacuate, those american citizens within a 50-mile radius of the reactors evacuate from that area. this is the same advice that the nrc would give if this incident were taking place in thenit uni states. >> how u.s. military pilots are not being allowed within that radius of the plant except for the ones who are going to assist in some relief missions. they are getting those iodine tablets. as the white house delivers the urgent message to get away, france and australia are telling their folks to get out of japan all together. steven chu told congress he can't say whether japan is responding appropriately because even he is hearing conflicting reports. the head of the nuclear regul regulatory commission -- nbc bay area news. >> thank you very much. >>> a bay area woman knows firsthand what it's like to survive a nuclear disaster. jodi
. many people who live and work in tokyo come from other parts of japan, and now they want to go home. there is definitely more than just a trickle now of families leaving tokyo for other parts of japan because of the fear of radiation. most of the more than 30 million people who live in and around the city, though, leaving is not an option. they have no place to go and if there is a major release of radiation from the fukushima plant, there dawes -- doesn't seem to be a plan what to do either. if there is, the asumi family hasn't been told about it. they are watching the events to the north with growing consternation. they have an 8-month-old baby and they simple isly don't trust what the government is telling them about the lack of danger. >> i don't think so. you don't trust them in? i don't trust them. >> why not? >> because companies say not -- not truth. >> and what is this you have bought? is is this new if >> yeah, new. >> so instead the asumis like millions of other tokyoites are making their own plans. helmets, facemasks and a car standing by to head south at a moment's noti
jones industrial average was up 150 points on signs japan could be getting the upper hand and he cuts it down to size and the news breaks he is saying he will threaten his people and then trade is fighting out, some cutting out, and others back in, so it finishes up 160 points so they dismiss the crazy guy for now. if you needed the prove, the forces are alive and well at wall and broad. but who wins? the one trying to contain the nuclear menace or the other being a many nasa. and what do you say? >>guest: we are at a crossroads and we are in a global economy. it is amazing 24 slash -- 24/7, and everyone is happy with the nuclear contains and muammar qaddafi comes out and stocks fall apart so we don't know from minute to minute or day-to-day the next headline and it makes it difficult to ride the roller coaster. >>neil: global events dictate the market. will that be the rule for a while? >>guest: it will be the rule for a long time. the foreseeable future. the two events we are talking about, were unforeseen. we were not thinking libya would fall apart six months ago or for see we hav
fan at the same time. we're also on japan and the guy who knows all important about how japan is to the financial world. joe brown, giant at ubs. the former democratic governor of virginia, doug wilder. this weekend, world coming back from the brink. we're here live saturday. >> glenn: hello, america. i want to welcome you to the "glenn beck program" and tell you tonight i'm going to lay out a theory. i have a lot of facts but i want to separate from facts from theory and you have to help figure this out. something is very wrong. it has been a busy couple of weeks for the president. there is a lot going on in the world. his job to lead the free world. what is he doing? he just carted his 60th round of golf as president. who hasn't golfed at least 60 times in the last two years? then, of course, the ncaa brackets. there is always a crisis. march madness is only once a year. today is st. patty's day. president went to capitol hill to celebrate that with congressional leaders. tomorrow, it's off for a well-deserved vacation in beautiful rio de janeiro. wow! may i just ask is he b
>>> on the broadcast tonight, the desperate measures under way to get the nuclear crisis in japan under control. >>> and president obama tells americans there's no threat from radiation coming across the pacific. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. while the japanese deal with a staggering humanitarian crisis, they are now engaging in a last-resort effort to stop perhaps multiple meltdowns at nuclear reactors. and today president obama had to reassure the american public that these fears of some sort of radioactive cloud coming all the way across the pacific to the west coast just aren't true. here's the latest now on the disaster in japan. desperate measures now under way to lessen the nuclear disaster. while tonight japanese officials are saying they have rare good news of some levels stabilizing, first today we got the first look at the reactors close up. this new video of a helicopter fly-over showing the destruction. then there are the numbers. just under 5700 dead, just under 10,000 missing and over three-quarters of a m
. >> the u.s. department of energy specialisterize now in japan. and berkeley-nuclear engineer are installing a radiation detector on campus although they insist there is no radiation problem here. john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> the earthquake damaged the nuclear reactors in japan is raising eyes about california's nuclear reactors. ktvu's mike mibach is in san francisco with what he learned. >> reporter: right here outside of pg&e headquarters, one of the power plants. tonight in this earthquake prone state they are calling for more studdies. >> reporter: california's nuclear power plant, today images from the filt near sacramento closed in 1989. officials say nuclear fuel remains on site. >> a small amount measurables. >> reporter: the nuclear power plant creates 15% of the state's electricity. it's designed to with stand a 5.5 magnitude quake. >> the structure where we pull in ocean cooling water for the cooling source is designed to with stand a tsunami up to 45 feet. >>> fault was detected a half mile away from the plant. >> we along with the usgs discovered the shoreline fault. >
>>> on the broadcast tonight, disaster in japan day six. on the nuclear crisis, the americans now say the radiation is much more dangerous than the japanese are letting on. while the heroic effort continues to stop a meltdown and recover from a quake and a tsunami, the fears over radiation continue. our coverage begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> a special good evening to our viewers in the west tonight. tonight in the midst of a massive humanitarian crisis in japan, for much of the day there was a disagreement between the americans and the japanese over how dangerous the nuclear crisis is and exactly how much radiation is being released into the environment. here's the very latest tonight on the japan disaster. the humanitarian crisis continues. over 4100 confirmed dead. there are 12,000 unaccounted for. 100 countries are now offering aid to japan. tens of thousands of people have been scanned for radiation. american citizens within 50 miles of the bad reactors have been told to evacuate or stay inside their homes after the most recent spike in radiatio
, we'll bring that to you live. in japan today here, the focus really is on this number 3 reactor. that is where we saw the video. you see it here of these helicopters dropping water. sea water in this attempt to cool it off and prevent a possible meltdown. tokyo electric or tepco is in this desperate rush to build a power line so the fukushima daiichi plant can power up its cooling systems once again. later on in this newscast, i'll be speaking with a man, an american man who was inside one of the facility, actually in a building next to one of the reactors working when the quake hit last friday. >> cracks were opening up on the ground. i looked over at the buildings around me and glass was breaking, lights, sirens, people screaming. >> can you imagine? he's a software engineer there for a couple weeks working on the power plant's computers. he has not spoken to cn nyet. but he will on this tram. we will also check in with our team in tokyo where shrinking supplies of food and gases are a growing concern. >>> a lot of ground to cover here. right off the bat, i want to show you so
>>> how the u.s. is hoping to prevent a nuclear disaster in japan while not putting lives at risk. >> reporter: u.s. customs and border protection is specifically monitoring traffic from japan. we have a live report from sfo. >> reporter: and what happened today that could mean a better commute for commuters of the east bay. >>> we begin with the obama administration announcing that the radioactive zone leaving japan does not pose a risk for this area. these are the latest aerial images of the fukushima dai- ichi plant. they are continuing efforts to cool rods while a local power company is trying to restore electricity by cooling pumps. here's more. >> reporter: japanese officials say they will keep trying to cool reactor number 3 at the fukushima dai-ichi attempt even though little has been done. >> translator: in order to start the cooling, we've asked for water-drop operations and the spraying of water from the ground. >> reporter: engineers began looking at ways to get the power back on. officials hope the power is restored -- once the power is restored to the plant, the powe
the battle to prevent a full blown nuclear catastrophe in japan. meanwhile, an anxious wait for a bay area woman whose husband is in japan trying to >>> japan's airports are about late tonight the state department started evacuating government workers and their families and told other americans to consider leaving immediately. chartered planes will be brought in to help private citizens who want to go. tonight the nuclear crisis is on the verge of becoming a catastrophe as water dumping helicopters work to stop a meltdown at the fukushima nuclear plant. 5* handful of brave men inside are facing disaster with water hoses. good evening. those workers, the so-called fukushima 50 are hungry and tired. these brave men are voluntarily working under conditions they know could kill them. alan wang is here with more on the desperate efforts to stop this meltdown. >> it is now believed the crippled plant is asking older workers to volunteer for this mission because even if they are exposed to massive amounts of radiation, they would more likely die of old age. and de spet high levels
york. the president is expected to make a statement about japan at 3:30 eastern time as japan grapples with a nuclear crisis and the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami there. the latest, the death toll stands at 5,429. nearly 10,000 people still missing. at the pufukushima nuclear plan desperate attempts to cool the reactor but these efforts are having limited impact. and the danger of radiation has delayed efforts to permanently restore water to the pumps to cool the reactor. power may not be up and rung until tomorrow at the earliest. the spnk giving military families the okay to leave major u.s. bases across japan. that order covers more than 40,000 people there. in addition, the u.s. is sending potassium iodide into the country in case people want to use it. and as a precaution, homeland secretary janet napolitano says all passengers and cargo from japan will now be screened for radiation in an abundance of caution. let's get to the white house briefing now. press secretary jay carney joined by gregory jaczko of the nuclear regulatory commission in this country. let's listen.
devastated north eastern japan, american nuclear energy leaders are taking a different position regarding the safe of japan's crippled nuclear plant. >> the white house warned u.s. citizens to clear the area 50 miles around the plant. japan is just advising a 20-mile evacuation. the state department is telling citizens to rely on the united states for updates. nbc's bay area is tracking the effort to stop a nuclear meltdown. >> reporter: we are monitoring all the information coming and it is hard to make sense of all this. what we do know is that right now in the last hour, the focus has shifted to a reactor at that daiichi nuclear plant. that's one thing we're watching. we're watching the advisory for american to get a little farther away from that plant than was originally recommended. now, the japanese government did double the number of workers they're sending in, trying to find out what's happening within the plant. they are working by flashlight. they are pumping sea water in to cool those fuel rods. from the outside, they will use water cannons instead of water dropping helicopters
in the nuclear business talk about big changes that need to be made. >>> and her mission of love in japan that comes with a warning for every household back home. good evening, i'm garvin thomas. >> and i'm jessica aguirre. nuclear scientists in japan tonight admit they're fighting an invisible enemy, radiation. the levels again spiking at those damaged power plants. now, just hours ago japanese crews innohi cok choppers started dumping sea water on reactors. in washington, u.s. officials are now warning that one, if not two, of those plants may be on the verge of spewing more radioactive material. and those fears are prompting a mass exodus from tokyo tonight. with the obama administration authorizing the first evacuations of americans. among those, nbc's chris jansing who talked with us minutes ago from the airport in tokyo. >> reporter: it's going to be interesting to see what the reaction of the japanese people is when they hear this news because america is the strongest ally. and i think for them to say that their people need to leave the dependence of their embassy personnel said th
>>> your realtime captioner is linda marie macdonald. >>> with things getting worse at japan's stricken nuclear power plant, the u.s. is arranging charter flights for americans who want to leave japan. i'm charlie d'agata in yoshita, japan, with the story coming up. >> the desperate search for loved ones during japan's worst crisis since world war ii. good morning, it is thursday, march 17, 2011, st. patrick's day. i'm sydnie kohara. >> hi, everybody. i'm frank mallicoat. it's 4:30. a good day to be hoop fans. we have a lot of basketball here on cbs. >> weather-wise, we have a lot of rain don't we, lawrence. >> all this rain is going to make everything nice and green around the bay area. yeah, happy st. patrick's day, folks. if you are heading out, things are going to be mostly dry today. but we do have a chance of a few showers north of the golden gate bridge. behind that, though, we have a significant storm system. that one is on the way. looks like friday could be a very wet and wild day around the bay area. we'll have more on that coming up. right now, let's get a check o
if the nuclear situation in japan is not brought under control within the next 24 hours. >> tracie potts has the latest now from washington. >> it appears to be white smoke begun to rise from the number three reactor. >> helicopters are now dropping water on japan's nuclear plant. >> we believe that secondary containment has been destroyed. there is no water in the spent fuel pool. >> no water means nothing to prevent a meltdown. the japanese deny that, but international authorities do believe it's overheating. the u.s. believes radiation levels there are extremely high. with conflicting reports coming from japan, the state department now warns americans to consider leaving or at least stay 50 miles away, 30 miles further than the japanese recommend. >> we are obviously advising american citizens that they listen to the nrc and the state department. >> some experts fear even that's not enough. >> 50 miles is not a safe distance to be in an emergency like that. >> the state department's organizing charter flights out of tokyo for what so far is a voluntary evacuation. president obama called j
. >>> here are the developments we're following this morning on the disaster in japan. president obama is allowing family members of u.s. government workers in japan to evacuate. arrangements are being made for charter flights. an earlier white house order told americans in japan to stay at least 50 miles away from the fukushima nuclear plant. japanese military helicopters have been dropping water on that crippled plant today. they're hoping the aerial assault will cool off the reactors and avoid a total meltdown. >>> the japanese stock market opened lower today. taking back yesterday's gains. the yen soared to a new high against the dollar on the currency markets. >>> finally, while the world watches the tragic events in japan, many wonder what we can do here to help. this includes one little massachusetts girl. >> she sprang into action selling her most precious items in hopes that she can help those who need it the most. here's tricia taskey of our affiliate wggb. >> here. >> this is autumn. and it's going to be hard for me to give her away. >> reporter: 7-year-old sage freeman is p
. officials in japan hope the helicopter bucket brigade can keep the reactors from overheating while the plant operators scramble to install a power line and use electricity to restore the reactor's cooling systems. >>> now, less than an hour ago, word came that the united states will start evacuating americans from japan, including private citizens and the families of u.s. personnel. president obama informed japan's prime minister of the plans tonight. the obama administration is chartering aircraft to accommodate americans who want to leave. also today the chairman of the u.s. regulatory commission says radiation near the fukushima plant is extremely high and damage at one reactor and worse than the japanese officials have acknowledged. >> and janna katsuyama just returned hours ago from tokyo. she is here now live. but how are the people feeling there now? >> well, it is a difficult situation there. walking through tokyo, the trains and the stations and the airport, there wasn't really any signs of panic or chaos. but we did find many foreigners quietly leaving. driving from tokyo to hanita
of japan. >>reporter: according to japan's chief secretary, at current radiation levels detected in not pose an immediate health risk to citizens. evacuation orders are in effect and fear is widespread. >> this accident is not a problem restrictiorestricted tor area i asked people japan to recognize this as a national problem. >>reporter: they're still trying to grasp the magnitude of last friday's historic disaster. if the rescue and recovery continues as the number of dead and missing nears 15,000. rescue crews are still hopeful of finding survivors. there's still plenty of opportunity for us to find it lives. >>reporter: that effort is being hampered by freezing temperatures and snow. as a precaution the u.s. embassy in tokyo is recommending that americans who live within 50 mi. of the nuclear plant evacuate. in washington, samantha hayes. >>pam: dr. alan hanson, with the institute for international studies in stamford joins us tonight to answer some of the questions and concerns people have. thank you for joining us. if it is true, the u.s. government hasn't been confirmed by
-ft. worth airports, radiation levels, thankfully low, have been picked up on passengers returning from japan. but the battle and the focus remain on the fukushima station and its crippled reactors. reactor number three, the scene of aerial water bombardment today, brave crew members dropped sea water in a desperate attempt to cool what is being describes as the single greatest threat. the fukushima six reactors, reactor three is the only one housing a mixed fuel known as mox, short for mixed oxide, a material made of reclaimed plutonium, the release of which would pose far more devastating effects than weave seen thus far. reactor four and its lack of water set off the biggest rift between nuclear authorities in the united states and japan. the u.s. believes the situation there is far worse than the japanese counterparts concede. the rift has led to a mini exodus of americans and others within japan. let's go now to nbc's chief environmental affairs correspondent, anne thompson. authorities in japan have just announced they may be close to restoring power to a stricken reactor, that's reacto
in the united states. >> we are going to be looking at what happened in japan and if we get information that telless us there is a safety action, we will take action immediately. we are not doing nothing. >> if he is correct about the situation in japan it means there may be nothing more that can be conto prevent the fuel rods from a melt down. >>> the feds are adding more radiation monitors in the united states as concerns rise. the epa monitors radiation throughout the area. this is one of the monitors on top of this building in san francisco. we showed you this on monday during the 10:00 news. it can detect changes in radiation levels across the country. >> there are two nuclear plants in california and one is next to a fault line that was just recently discovered. >> reporter: that senatorrer is pointing his finger at pg&e, a company that prides itself on safety. that senator is asking it to do studies because of that fault line next to its power plant. >> this is the nuclear power plant. it creates 15% of the state's electricity. designed to with stand a 5.5 magnitude earthquake an
>>> we've been showing you all kinds of destruction in japan. that's a little shaking, mud-spattered cocker span yell in the sendai area. he watched over his injured friend since the tsunami destroyed his home. rescue crews took both dogs to a vet for treatment. >>> candy crowley is anchors "the situation room." >>> now, breaking news. urgent new teams to cool down an overheated reactor. now the u.s. government is stepping in to evacuate possibly thousands of americans from the country and get them away from any nuclear danger. secretary of state hillary clinton tells our wolf blitzer she's worried about the health and saved of americans in japan even as she heads home from tunis tunisia. i'm candy crowley, you're in "the situation room." nuclear experts say the new attempt to douse an overheated reactor has been somewhat effective. helicopters, fire trucks and police water cannons all have been deployed. we are told that radiation levels dipped, but they are still high, so the frarchtic work to prevent a full-scale meltdown goes on. cnn's anna coren is nil tokyo. just brin
) you heard people saying what's happening in japan so far is worse than three mile island, but not as bad as chernobyl, well, okay. it is good to understand that, but it is also good to understand that there's a lot of room between the consequences of three mile island and chernobyl. not just the magnitude and type of accidents themselves, but the consequences of those accidents. how much radioactivity was released, and what it did to people. the on-going crisis in japan is about trying to minimize the amount of radiation that's going to be released from the reactors at daiichi. understanding the difference between this disaster and previous nuclear disasters is empirical. it is understandable even if you're not a physicist. i certainly am not. we have six reactors in japan together at daiichi. three of them, numbers one, two, and three were on, were producing power when the earthquake hit. they automatically shut down, now it has been a matter of keeping enough water flowing into the cooling systems of the reactors to keep the hot radioactive fuel rods covered up so they
on the mounting nuclear crisis in japan, authorizing the first evacuations of american government employees out of the country. in addition, the state department is warning all u.s. citizens to consider leaving japan. the unpredictable weather conditions risks spreading radioactive material. that move comes as japanese crews and military helicopters brave radiation to dump sea water on to the stricken fukushima complex. the tactics are an attempt to cool overheated radium fuel that may be on the verge of spewing out more radiation. meanwhile, plant operators say they're racing to finish a new power line that could restore cooling systems and ease the crisis. still, the top u.s. nuclear regulatory official is warning american citizens within 50 miles of the complex to leave the area or at least remain indoors. testifying on capitol hill yesterday that the situation is "very serious." >> we believe that there is no water in the spent fuel pool known as number four. i would say that it is my great hope that the information that we have is not accurate. i would hope for the sake of everyone that th
from of japan's nuclear reactors. u.s. officials cannot expect the japanese to quickly regained control of the plan's fuel rods. dangerous levels of radiation. good evening, everybody. all lan security is saying that radiation levels from flights from japan, landing and chicago, n.y.. to have real activity, but not enough to be concerned about. - radioactivity. first, what steps are being taken? nuclear helicopters tons of water the pilots cannot get very close. only one of the drop hit the target. not much of an impact. later, soldiers used high-pressure fire trucks. and used that on number three for 30 minutes. 140 mi. away and tokyo the japanese are trying to flee their country. rolling blackouts, food and fuel supplies are low. the united states as it advised americans still stay 50 mi. away from the nuclear areas. the evacue evacuation process of americans out of japan. president obama is telling people not to worry about nuclear plum in our country. >> i want to be very clear that we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the not states. or if it is the west coast, haw
. >> i think the events unfolding in japan incidence actually appear to be more serious than three mile island. to what extent we don't really know now. so as their unfolding very rapidly on an hour by hour, day-by-day basis and there are conflicting reports. we don't really know in detail what's happening. >> we're at a moment in time where, obviously, all of us are heartbroken by the images of what the happening in japan. we're reminded of how american leadership is critical to our closest allies even if those allies are economically advanced and powerful, there are moments when we need our help and we're bound together by a common humanity. >> all right. welcome to "morning joe." a live look at times square. it is thursday, march 17th, st. patrick's day, with us on set, pulitzer prize-winning historian, jon meacham, the chairman of deutsch incorporated, donny deutsch and columnist for "the new york times," nicholas kristof. also in washington, msnbc contributor mike barnicle. a lot going on today. japan looking graver and graver by the moment. >> certainly is. it seems, there's been
in japan. japan.the japanese emperor has addressed the nation, expressing condolencessfor victims of the earthquake and tsunami.friday's quake registered at 9-point-0. more than 10-thousand people are believed to be dead. an increasingly tense situation continuus in northern japan, where expeets are exploring extreme new measures to prevent a meltdown at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. helicopters began flying ii water to dump on the reactor from the ir. greg black tells us it's an unusual move, but experts say it's the latest being taken to prevent a potential catastrophe. catastrophe. &p--reporter pkgg-s follows -- the lattst effort to prevent a meltdown at a japanese nuclear plant is coming from above. helicopters dropped thousands of gallons of water on the overheating reactors on wednesday, while crews n sprayed water from trucks outside the reactor.we're trying to combine these two approaches to maximize the effect f the waaer spraying. the u-s military is sending also support to the region.... a plane that can detect radiationnlevels from the air. restore powe
. >> the situation appears more bleak by the day. >> dual disaster crippling japan. >> earthquake victims force today move away from the nuclear site as the crisis continues to get worse. >> radiation levels south of the plant spiked to 300 times the normal level today. >> pictures of smoke coming out of one of the reactors. >> new ruptures and fires releasing yet more radiation into the air in northern japan. >> none of us had any traces of radioactivity. when they checked our shoes, they did find. >> good thing or bad thing? >> that's a bad thing. >> inside the plant, those brave workers are still on the job. >> photos show extensive damage at three of four reactors there. >> plant workers in shifts of 50 are back at their posts. >> the fukushima nuclear plant for nearly an hour. >> 45 minutes later said they were allowing workers back. >> they crawl through the lib rinths of equipment in darkness with only their flashlight. >> there's the race to help victims homeless in a cold, japanese winter. >> nbc's lee cowan çmade it ba to tokyo. temperatures have dipped well below freezing, it is snowing
plant in japan. right now, emergency workers are risking their lives to prevent a complete nuclear meltdown. crews began the first of four helicopter water drops. at the same time, workers on the ground are using a water cannon meant for riots to shoot water directly into one of the reactors. it is a desperate last ditch effort to keep spent nuclear fuel rods from melting. in a potentially troubling sign white steam was again seen rising from three of the reactors. radiation levels at the plant dangerously high. japan's electric company is working desperately to reconnect power at the plant today. meantime, damning reports about the owner of the japanese power plant. accord to the australian, the owner falsified safety data and said in 1989 tokyo electric injected air into the containment vessel of a reactor number one to lower the leak rate and when caught apologized for "dishonest practices." now, abc's martha raddatz with the latest on the last ditch effort to saint planet. >>> 50 workers inside the plant working in the dark with nothing but flash lights wearing overalls and hea
's go back to dave and pam. >>> all right. thank you, sal. in japan helicopters are still dumping sea water on the earthquake damaged nuclear plant trying to prevent a meltdown. the helicopter crews can only work about 40 minutes at a time for their own safety to limit radiation exposure. now the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission says there's no more water in one of the spent fuel pools at the plant. increasing the chance of widespread nuclear fallout. however, japanese officials deny that that pool is dry. the u.s. government is now chartering airplanes to help evacuate u.s. citizens from japan because of the rising radiation levels. voluntary evacuation to family members of government employees. >>> time now 5:01. scientists here on the west coast are closely watching the movement of the radioactive plume coming from the crippled japanese nuclear reactors. it's expected to hit the illusion islands south of alaska some time today. that plume is then expected to reach southern california late tomorrow. the health experts are emphasizing radiation levels are plunging as th
radius to stay inside. we'll take a look at the difference between the u.s. recommendation and what japan is doing and saying. that's coming up later in the show. >> there is a big divide growing on that. many foreigners in japan trying to get out of the country. thousands of travelers packing tokyo's main airport. look at scene. many of them saying better safe than sorry. >> i'm worried with they are sharing about it and whether they are in control. not understanding japanese, it's a concern for me. >> i'm going home. the decision is not very clearly. so this decision is not difficult. but the situation is dangerous. so we have to leave. martha: the scramble is on to get out. several european airlines rerouted flights head for tokyo, now those travelers have to find their way to the southern part of the country. the faa say they are monitoring the situation. rick: the concern about radiation reaching the u.s. west coast. the feds are deploying radiation monitors in the area. it does not expect harmful radiation levels to reach the u.s. it posts that data on the web site. in japan the dis
of japan as nuclear meltdown concerns grow. >>> line of fire, security cameras capture a dramatic shoot-out at a tennessee convenience stor >>> and space odyssey, video unveils the international space >>> and space odyssey, video unveils the international space station's newest resident. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry. today, we begin with exit strategy. as japan's nuclear crisis deepens and reports about the status of one of its nuclear plants differ, the united states has authorized the first evacuation of mernsz out of japan. tracie potts joins us from washington with the latest on this. good morning. >> reporter: lynn, good morning. good morning, everybody. we learned overnight that these will be volunteer evacuations even though the airports have reopened, commercial flights are available, the u.s. state department will be organizing charter flights out of tokyo and other locations in japan to get americans out. the u.s. believes that the radiation levels, especially around the fukushima daiichi mran plants are extremely hig
bunker. despite little radiation risk in most of japan, this morning, there's a race to leave the country. >> for the first time, the u.s. has authorized the evacuation of family members of american diplomats. charter planes are being used to fly americans away from danger. >> and the u.s. is pressuring japan to step up its efforts to avert a nuclear meltdown. they dropped sea water on the crippled reactors today. a heroic step, since the pilots are risking their lives to complete that mission. >> and the tokyo stock market, dropping once again. >>> it was a night of high-level phone calls over the nuclear crisis, as president obama spoke to the japanese prime minister. >> while the white house offered full support in helping japan recover, the president underscored his concern of the safety of americans. emily schmidt begins our report from washington. >> reporter: with the nuclear plant crippled on the ground, desperate efforts are coming from the air. helicopters dumping sea water into the holes of the roof of damaged reactor number three, hoping to cool it enough to prevent a nuclear
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